FollowFriday – Week of 05/10/2010

Twitter Follow Friday

Time for this week’s #FollowFriday or #FF blog post. Once again, I’m pulling entries I’ve posted over on the Mr. Tweet service. You can see my running list of recommendations on Mr. Tweet. Today’s tweeps of note:

@JohnPoz – the man behind the website analytics gift that is Woopra, I met John P at Photoshop World, Las Vegas. He spins a few tales over at One Man’s Blog, a website infamous through its use of Lady Gaga imagery.

@forces2 – he refers to himself as the DJ of recycled jokes. I enjoy his 140 wit, late at night when I’m knockin’ out work.

@HeathRowe – his blog is great source of Adobe developer info with tutorials on Photoshop & Fireworks just to name a few.

@JustinSeeley – what can I say about Justin? He’s the man behind the Photoshop QuickTips podcast, a staple on most iPods everywhere. He’s seemingly everywhere with a blog & social media company.

@Landailyn – photo restoration artist Janine Smith is one of my cohorts over at TipSquirrel. A Photoshop Guru Award winner, Janine is a star on the rise.

Alrighty, that wraps up today’s #FollowFriday listing. Have a great weekend!

FollowFriday – Week of 05/07/2010

Twitter Follow Friday

Following the footsteps of my good friend Glyn Dewis, who took a note from Chris Brogan, today marks my first #FollowFriday or #FF blog post. For those who enjoy sharing their favorite tweeps with others, I highly recommend using Twitter Lists (I really need to organize mine better), and also the Mr. Tweet service. You can see my running list of recommendations on Mr. Tweet. In addition to listing Twitter ID’s, I will also be posting user website info. Here is today’s #FF selection:

@GlynDewis – he gets the top spot for the idea. You should follow him because he’s a PHENOMENAL photographer, an Adobe Community Professional and all around good guy. We met at Photoshop World in Las Vegas a few years ago, and Glyn is a true inspiration for those folks who want to pursue their dreams. Some folks are all talk. Not Glyn.

@HauteShotsVegas – Stacy creates incredibly sexy images that empower her clientele. Love love love what she does. A fine example of boudoir photography done well.

@LRSecrets – Gene has quickly become the expert in all things Lightroom. Another Adobe Community Professional, I use his Lightroom Secrets website whenever I need a reference. (Surprise, I don’t know it all)

@LearnwithBetsyBetsy’s website is a great learning center for both the hobbyist & professional photographer. She provides a wealth of information including PPA coverage, CPP certification info, and product/service reviews.

@xequals – “Image Workflow Technology Business” that sums up what you’ll get on the XEQUALS website run by Brandon. Another fine resource for Lightroom presets, technology coverage and reviews.

Alrighty, that wraps up today’s #FollowFriday listing. Be sure to check back each week as I’ve a ton of people to talk about.

Aperture 3 vs Lightroom 3 (beta 2) – Feature Comparison Review

This is feature comparison review of Aperture 3 vs Lightroom 3 (public beta 2). While it is not my intention to be overly favorable of Lightroom, my opinions reflect those of an Adobe Community Professional & Lightroom enthusiast. There are definitely things I like in Aperture. That being said, what follows are my thoughts & observations about both products. Keep in mind, Lightroom 3 has not been officially released, and the findings here will be updated when LR3 ships.

PROGRAM INTERFACE

While suited to the same task, Aperture & Lightroom utilize different approaches to managing & adjusting images. This is apparent when viewing the layout of each program’s interface.

Aperture’s interface is divided into two primary areas–The Inspector & Viewer. The Inspector features three primary tabs for working with images–Library, Metadata & Adjustments. Images display in the Viewer in either a Grid, Filmstrip or Single Image view. The Viewer window remains constant when moving between Inspector tabs. The Inspector can be toggled on & off, and Aperture can be put into a full screen mode.

Lightroom’s interface is divided into modules coinciding with a digital workflow–Library, Develop, Slideshow, Print & Web. Within each module reside a left-side navigation panel, right-side adjustments panel, center image view area, and bottom film strip control. Images display in the center image area regardless of module, all panels can be toggled on & off individually, and Lightroom can be put into a full screen mode.

Comment – In terms of UI (user interface) I prefer Lightroom’s module approach. Having the UI align with the tasks at hand, leaves a lot of guesswork out for new users. I also prefer LR’s implementation of keyboard shortcuts. “C” for compare view makes more sense to me than OPT+O. Many of Lightroom’s keys have a root in the actual command.

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Set It Right In Camera with Photojojo’s White Balance Lens Cap

It’s a question that comes up often in my Lightroom & Photoshop classes – what’s the best way to white balance my images?

In the world of post-processing there are a number of answers to that question. Photoshop has Levels & Curves, Layers & Filters, you can click with eyedroppers  or use the new On-Image-Adjustment Tool  in CS4. Photographers using Lightroom have a more straightforward approach as white balance is the first adjustment in the Basic panel under the Develop module. However, beginners & advanced users alike must acknowledge the time it takes to white balance an image regardless of the steps you choose to take. As a production specialist, I’m always looking for ways to reduce the time spent on tasks. My students know that I preach “Actions, Presets, & Macros” because my time is valuable to me. It’s true, I can make Photoshop sing, and Lightroom seemingly bends to my will (I kid, I kid), but the smartest way to white balance your images is to do it right in camera.

*cue music*

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